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Friday, 23 March, 2018

How Dare They

Date: 05 August, 2014

By: Chief

Imagence again government has made a commitment and, as usual, isn't living up to their side of the commitment. The government in question is the City of Roswell, New Mexico. The commitment in question is the maintenance of the new Veterans Cemetery. Or lack of maintenance may be a far better way of putting it. It is most certainly truthful. Quoting KOB news:

"The veteran's cemetery in Roswell has only been around for a few weeks, and it doesn't look like it's getting a lot of attention.

"Already, the new cemetery is overgrown with weeds."

As I said — how dare they.

While this may not be Earth shattering to you or even to most people — it is Earth shattering to We the Veterans. Far more importantly it is critically important to our:

After all what are we if we cannot even take care of our dead? The answer to this paradoxically simple question is — not much.

It matters

Indeed, it does matter. When called upon it was young men and women, now veterans, who answered the call to arms. No ifs, no ands and no buts about it. Whenever the call rang out it was answered. They all took up arms, left family and friends, scared, but determined and did the job that needed doing.

When the job was done they came home. All were changed by the experience. The carnage of war changes everybody. That cannot be helped. Some were changed physically. Some mentally. All emotionally. All gave. Some more than others. Most came home alive. Some did not.

So, as you can plainly see — it does matter.

It is all about honor

In this particular case it is about honoring our dead. Those who paid the ultimate price. Aye. Yet do not forget that someday each one of us — each veteran — will end up next to his brothers and sisters — a family forged, formed and birthed by fire and blood. We did not escape life alive. Nobody does.

So yes, honoring our deceased veterans is important. It is a way of saying 'Thank You'. Possibly a way of paying a debt. Mostly it is a method of remembrance of the price paid for admission to that hallowed ground. If you remember us then you have honored us because our collective sacrifice was worth the price of admission.

A warning

A veterans cemetery also stands as a stark warning — do not forget us, what we did and the price we all paid. For if we are forgotten then what we did was for no purpose and our posterity shall once again have to take up the call.

What is utterly disgraceful about the Roswell Veteran's Cemetery is that it is so relatively new. And yet somehow, some way, shape or form those in the 'Ivory Tower' have already forgotten. The place is over grown with weeds. I would not be in the least surprised to see Tarzan swinging through the place on a vine. As veteran Mr. Harry McGraw said (quoting KOB news):

"It's a disgrace, it's a disgrace to veterans, I'm pissed off about it[.]"

Another veteran Mr. Bert Eldridge ended up going after the Roswell City manager and screaming at him. One would think that the issue of keeping the grass cut and the weeds knocked back would not be that big of a deal. Obviously, I was wrong. Quoting KOB news:

" 'All I ask is take care of it, make it respectful for the veterans that are buried here', said Eldridge. 'We have 30 veterans in here already and their families I can imagine what they feel like when they drive out here and see this'."

What they feel is — forgotten. Disgraced. We have forgotten them and their sacrifice and that is the biggest disservice, the largest dishonor that there is. And that my friends is shameful.


Veterans and their families do not ask for much. We never have.

are the two most important items on a very short list.

The Roswell City Manager said (quoting KOB news):

"[T]hey fell behind and have every intention of keeping it maintained going forward."

Really Mr. City Manager. Well I've got a real old, well worn, yet very true expression I think you need to be reminded of:

'The road to hell is paved with good intentions'.

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